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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Krannert Art Museum Exhibitions Guide Archive: Provenance

This guide assembles research guides for past Krannert Art Museum shows.

About This Guide

This guide provides information and links to additional resources about the artists included the Krannert Art Museum's exhibition, Provenance: A Forensic History of Art on view May 13, 2017-December 8, 2018. If you need help finding additional information, please contact the Ricker Library

              

About KAM and the Collection

Ricker Library

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The Ricker Library of Architecture & Art
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About the Exhibition

This exhibition presents recent research into the World War II-era provenance of the Trees collection at Krannert Art Museum to examine the history of ownership through six of the museum’s longest-held paintings. Exploring themes such as genealogy, documentation, attribution, and the perplexing problem of identifying unfamiliar collectors’ marks, Provenance: A Forensic History of Art displaces the prevalent conception of forensic inquiry as a tool for crime scene investigation and relocates it from the laboratory to the art collection. Etymologically, forensics relate to courts of law: a “forensic” investigation denotes the methodical examination and compilation of evidence for a court or other public forum. Likewise, provenance research is a forensic method employed to reconstruct legal chains of ownership that establish an artwork’s whereabouts from the moment of creation to its present circumstances.

Once customary, this now unsung approach to art history yields rich and nuanced information about the lives of objects—information whose value lies not only in its legal significance, but also its ability to reveal the very personal journeys of artworks through the lives of collectors.

Works included in the exhibition are 15th–19th century paintings by Moretta da Brescia (attributed), Ambrosius Holbein (attributed), Master of the St. Ursula Legend, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Theodule Ribot, and George Romney (after).

Curated by Nancy Karrels, doctoral candidate in Art History
Exhibition based on research supervised by Maureen Warren, curator of European and American Art

Fair Use Guidelines

Materials accessed in this guide are provided for personal and/or scholarly use.  Users are responsible for obtaining any copyright permissions that may be required for their own further uses of that material.  For more information about fair use please refer to the College Art Association Code of Best Practices in Fair Use in the Visual Arts.