Skip to main content

University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Making and Breaking Medieval Manuscripts -- Krannert Art Museum, November 17, 2016-February 11, 2017: Home

This guide provides information and additional resources for the museum exhibit.

About this Guide

This guide provides information and links to additional resources about the the materials in the Krannert Art Museum's exhibition, Making and Breaking Medieval Manuscripts, November 2016 through February 2017. The exhibition is located on the Main Level of KAM in the West Gallery.  If you need help finding additional information, please contact the Ricker Library.

About KAM and the Collection

Krannert Art Museum (KAM) is a museum of fine arts that houses the University of Illinois art collection. This link will provide you with more information about the museum, the collection, exhibitions, and events at KAM.

Ricker Library

The Ricker Library of Architecture & Art
Contact:
208 Architecture Building
608 East Lorado Taft Drive
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0224
Website / Blog Page

About the Exhibition

Both before and after the advent of movable type in Europe, circa 1450, artists created hand-drawn and hand-embellished scrolls, books, and maps. In Western Europe during the Middle Ages, manuscript ornamentation became a flourishing art form, enriching secular and sacred items alike.

 

Making and Breaking Medieval Manuscripts brings together a selection of works that are owned in whole or in part by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, including items in the Krannert Art Museum collection and items housed at the Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Spurlock Museum of World Cultures, and the Newberry Library in Chicago.

 

The exhibition showcases Western European manuscripts from the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries and examines issues associated with the production of illuminations and other decorations, patronage, owner additions and modifications, the impact of printing technologies, the reuse of parchment, book breaking, and the legacy of the self-professed “biblioclast” Otto F. Ege.

 

Making and breaking medieval manuscripts was curated by Maureen Warren and Anna Chen.

Fair Use Guidelines

Materials accessed in this guide are provided for personal and/or scholarly use.  Users are responsible for obtaining any copyright permissions that may be required for their own further uses of that material.  For more information about fair use please refer to the College Art Association Code of Best Practices in Fair Use in the Visual Arts.