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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Coveting Nature -- Krannert Art Museum, August 24, 2017 - December 22, 2017: Home

This guide provides additional resources and information on the artists and objects included in the exhibition Coveting Nature: Art, Collecting, and Natural History in Early Modern Europe.

About this Guide

This guide provides information and links to additional resources about the the materials in the Krannert Art Museum's exhibition, Coveting Nature, August 24 through December 22, 2017 in the Contemporary Gallery (main level). Please note, not all artists are included in the information provided. If you need help finding additional information, please contact the Ricker Library.

About KAM and the Collection

Krannert Art Museum (KAM) is a museum of fine arts that houses the University of Illinois art collection. This link will provide you with more information about the museum, the collection, exhibitions, and events at KAM.

Ricker Library

The Ricker Library of Architecture & Art's picture
The Ricker Library of Architecture & Art
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About the Exhibition

Coveting Nature explores the ways in which botanists and entomologists worked in tandem with artists and illustrators to record and disseminate knowledge in the early modern period (1500-1800). Natural history owes much to the tradition of assembling cabinets of curiosity in which natural specimens were collected alongside objects with geological, ethnographic, and artistic significance. In this period, the refinement of printed images revolutionized the observational sciences. Increasingly sophisticated woodcuts and eventually engravings, which could be augmented with hand coloring, largely superseded hand-drawn images, more crude woodcuts, and verbal descriptions in scientific publications, while also appealing to artists and art lovers. These refined images were made by professional printmakers as well as by author-illustrators that engraved the plates for their own publications. “Coveting Nature” will also explore the early and significant contributions of female artists and naturalists, such as Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717), Anna Ruysch (1666-1754), and Elizabeth Blackwell (1707-1758), and their enduring legacy.

 

Coveting Nature was curated by Maureen Warren and Anna Chen.

Fair Use Guidelines

Materials accessed in this guide are provided for personal and/or scholarly use.  Users are responsible for obtaining any copyright permissions that may be required for their own further uses of that material.  For more information about fair use please refer to the College Art Association Code of Best Practices in Fair Use in the Visual Arts.