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Allan deSouza: Through the Black Country... --Krannert Art Museum, January 25, 2018-July 14, 2018: Home

This guide provides additional resources and information on the artists and objects included in the exhibition Allan deSouza: Through the Black Country...

About this Guide

This guide provides information and links to additional resources about the the materials in the Krannert Art Museum's exhibition, Allan Desouza: Through the Black Country, January 25 through July 14, 2018 in the Contemporary Gallery (main level). If you need help finding additional information, please contact the Ricker Library.

About KAM and the Collection

Krannert Art Museum (KAM) is a museum of fine arts that houses the University of Illinois art collection. This link will provide you with more information about the museum, the collection, exhibitions, and events at KAM.

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About the Exhibition

Allan deSouza is internationally acclaimed for his photographic, installation, text, and performance works that restage historical evidence through counter-strategies of fiction, erasure, and (mis)translation.

DeSouza’s most recent work reenacts and upends iconic colonial narratives of discovery in Africa.Through the Black Country recounts the expedition to England of the Zanzibari crypto-ethnologist Hafeed Sidi Mubarak Mumbai, the fictional great-grandson of the historic figure Sidi Mubarak Bombay — an enslaved African who, upon gaining his freedom in India, returned to Africa to lead numerous British-led expeditions across Africa. Maps, photographs, diary entries, and a recreated base camp narrate Hafeed’s search for the elusive source of the River Thames. Crossing into London from Calais France, the site of a sprawling refugee camp know as “The Jungle,” the expedition begins in May 2016 and continues during the Brexit vote in June. 

Hafeed’s diaristic voice is written in the rhythm, language, and moralizing tone of Henry Morton Stanley—the explorer of “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?” fame—preserving yet inverting the relationship of observer to observed. Emerging through strategies of absurd mimicry, collage, layering, reversal, and artifice, the expedition reveals the fraught imperial legacies that have come to shape the London cityscape. As navigational devices that layer time, place, and traveler, Hafeed’s maps and cartographic motifs take us through Allan deSouza’s own personal history—having grown up in London—and also aid the viewer in “discovering” the broader implications of the work, such as the racial and economic violence of immigration, gentrification, and calls to “make Britain great again.” Visitors are invited to traverse the works for clues and connections, and to chart their own course through Hafeed’s re-staging of the London metropolis.

 

In addition to his art practice, Allan deSouza is chair of the department of Art Practice at the University of California, Berkeley. His current book project, How Art Can Be Thought, an examination of art pedagogy and a lexicon of terms used within the art critique, will be published in 2018. 

Curator: Allyson Purpura

Krannert Art Museum exhibitions are made possible in part by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. 

Fair Use Guidelines

Materials accessed in this guide are provided for personal and/or scholarly use.  Users are responsible for obtaining any copyright permissions that may be required for their own further uses of that material.  For more information about fair use please refer to the College Art Association Code of Best Practices in Fair Use in the Visual Arts.