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Postwar Printmaking in the United States, 1945–1955--Krannert Art Museum, Oct 5, 2017 to March 17, 2018: Home

Krannert Art Museum exhibition guide for Postwar Printmaking in the United States, 1945-1955

About This Guide

This guide provides information and links to additional resources about the artists included the Krannert Art Museum's exhibition, Postwar Printmaking in the United States, 1945-1955 on view October 5, 2017-March 17, 2018. If you need help finding additional information, please contact the Ricker Library

              

About KAM and the Collection

Ricker Library

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About the Exhibition

Still reeling from the horrors of World War II, artists in the United States felt compelled to find new meaning in their art and, in doing so, sought different artistic techniques and methods. A number of painters and sculptors began experimenting with printmaking, often attending printing studios, such as Stanley William Hayter’s Atelier 17 in New York City.

Culled from the museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition highlights a range of printmaking techniques employed by Leonard Baskin, Bernard Buffet, Ralston Crawford, Worden Day, Leonard Edmonson, Antonio Frasconi, Stanley William Hayter, John Paul Jones, Vera Klement, Mauricio LasanskySeong Moy, Gabor Peterdi, Jackson Pollock, Karl SchragHedda Sterne, John TalleurRufino TamayoNahum Tschacbasov, and Richard Zoellner.

Curated by Kathryn Koca Polite

Fair Use Guidelines

Materials accessed in this guide are provided for personal and/or scholarly use.  Users are responsible for obtaining any copyright permissions that may be required for their own further uses of that material.  For more information about fair use please refer to the College Art Association Code of Best Practices in Fair Use in the Visual Arts.