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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Bibliography Help: MLA Electronic/Online

Uni students are often asked to complete papers and projects that require using and citing resources created by others. Use these resources to make your job easier.

Notes

Disclaimer: This handout is only meant as a guide. If we tried to cover all citations you might make, we’d have a book—which is exactly what the Modern Language Association (MLA) publishes every couple of years. You should check the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th edition, if you have a question that this guide doesn’t answer. See the library for a copy (call number R 808.02 M72ml 2009 in the reference section).

Formatting your citations: In making your list of works cited, begin each entry flush with the left margin; if the entry runs more than a line long, the next lines should be indented one-half inch from the left margin. On many word processors you can accomplish this by paragraph formatting for a "hanging indent." (Whichever you choose, be consistent throughout.) Also use double spacing for your entire list, both between and within entries.

Websites

Websites

*Note: URLs are optional. Only include a URL when the reader could not locate the source without it or your teacher requires you to. URLs should be placed after the date of access enclosed in brackets and ending in a period.

  • Lastname, Firstname Middlename or Organization (as author). Title of Page. Title of website (if different from page; if included, place the title of the page in quotation marks). Publisher or sponsor of the website (if found; if not, write N.p.), Date published (if found; if not, write n.d.). Web. Date accessed.
  • Duck, Donald. "My Greatest Accomplishments in the Biz." Donald Duck's World. Disney, n.d. Web. 22 Jan. 2006.
  • Mouse, Mickey. How I Came to Be a Cultural Icon. N.p., 12 Nov. 2006. Web. 22 Jan. 2007.
  • "Are You Allergic to Your Pet?" ASPCA: The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. ASPCA, n.d. Web. 17 June 2009.   
  • Hautaluoma, Grey, Ashley Edwards, Nancy Neal Jones, and George H. Diller. "NASA Returning to the Moon with First Lunar Launch in a Decade." Press Release Archives. NASA, 18 June 2009. Web. 19 June 2009.
  • Grabianowski, Ed. "How Recycling Works." HowStuffWorks. HowStuffWorks, 17 Aug. 2007. Web. 19 June 2009.
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. "Over the Top: Green Roof Research at the Environmental Protection Agency." Research and Development. US EPA, 9 Apr. 2009. Web. 19 June 2009.
  • Westerfeld, Scott. "Update on the Uglies Movie." Westerblog. N.p., 21 June 2009. Web. 22 June 2009.

Articles Online

Articles from online databases (like Academic Search Premier or LexisNexis)

These are usually articles from journals, magazines, or newspapers that can be accessed over the Web using a database such as LexisNexis, Academic Search Premier or MAS Ultra - School Edition.

*Note: URLs are optional. Only include a URL when the reader could not locate the source without it or your teacher requires you to. URLs should be placed after the date of access enclosed in brackets and ending in a period.

  • Lastname, Firstname. "Title of Article." Title of Journal Vol.Issue# (YYYY): pp-pp. Database Title. Web. Date accessed.
  • Berkley, Catherine S., et al. "One-Year Changes in Activity and in Inactivity Among 10- to 15-Year-Old Boys and Girls." New York Times (Apr. 7,
  • 2007): 836-43. LexisNexis Academic. Web. 12 Sept. 2007.
  • "Study Reveals What Kids Are Reading for School." T H E Journal 35.6 (June 2008): 4. Academic OneFile. Web. 20 May 2009.
  • "Voices Debate the Coming of a Postliterate Age." Futurist 42.4 (July/Aug. 2008): 31. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 17 June 2009.


Articles from online magazines and journals

These are journals or magazines that are published directly on the web. Articles obtained directly from the website of a magazine or journal are cited differently than magazine and journal articles you find in article databases like Academic Search Premier and Lexis-Nexis (which include articles from many different publications).

  • Lastname, Firstname. "Title of Article." Title of Magazine DD MONTH [abbreviate except for May, June, and July] YYYY: pp-pp (use n. pag. if there are no page numbers). Web. Date accessed.
  • Lastname, Firstname. "Title of Article." Title of Journal Vol.Issue# (YYYY): pp-pp (use n. pag. if there are no page numbers). Web. Date accessed.
  • Foley, Barbara. "From Situational Dialectics to Pseudo-Dialectics: Mao, Jiang, and Capitalist Transition." Cultural Logic. 2006: n. pag. Web. 10 Jan. 2008.
  • Grossman, Lev. "The Quest for Cool." Time. 8 Sept. 2007: n. pag. Web. 10 Sept. 2007.
  • Harry, Dirty. "Movies I Love." Movie Characters Speak 4.6 (2006): 12-19. Web. 15 Mar. 2008.
  • Lennox, Mary. "The Social Ramifications of Growing Up with Only an Uncle." Children's Literature Characters Study Themselves 12.5 (2006): 222-35. Web. 14 Dec. 2008.



Articles from online newspapers

Use this format for articles from newspapers available in full-text format over the web. Note that if you found a newspaper article through an article database like Lexis-Nexis or EBSCO, you should cite it using the "Articles from online databases" format given above.

  • Lastname, Firstname Middlename (if found). "Article Title." Newspaper Title DD Mon. YYYY. Web. Date accessed.
  • "Crazy Citation Phenomenon." MLA News 31 Oct. 2006. Web. 1 Nov. 2008.
  • Weintraub, Elaine. "Adding History to Island's Heritage Trail." Vineyard Gazette 22 Aug. 2006. Web. 19 Feb. 2008.
  • Sutton, William. "I Bet Bermuda Is Nice This Time of Year." Uni High Teacher Times On the Web 14 May 2006. Web. 15 May 2007.