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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

An Introduction to XML and TEI

This guide provides an introduction to XML and the Text Encoding Initiative.

Letter

Here is XML applied to a short letter.


<letter>

   <date>March 15, 2013</date>

   <salutation>Dear <name>Joe</name></salutation>

   <paragraph>How's it going? Some weather we're having! Say hi to <name>Mary</name>!</paragraph>

   <signature>From, <name>Bob</name></signature>

</letter>


This XML is well-formed because it has one element <letter>, which includes all the other elements. Each section of text is properly delimited and none of the elements overlap.  Remember, it cannot be valid because we have not specified a schema against which to validate it, but it follows the basic rules of XML and is thus well-formed.

 

Poem

Below is an example of XML applied to a poem.

<poem>

   <head>XXI.</head>

   <title>A Book.</title>

   <stanza>

      <l>He ate and drank the precious words,</l>

      <l>His Spirit grew robust;</l>

      <l>He knew no more that he was poor,</l>

      <l>Nor that his frame was dust.<l>

      <l>He danced along the dingy days,</l>

      <l>And this bequest of wings</l>

      <l>Was but a book. What liberty</l>

      <l>A loosened Spirit brings!</l>

   </stanza>

</poem>

Here again, the XML is well-formed because it has one element <poem>, which includes all the other elements. Each section of text is properly delimited and none of the elements overlap.  Remember, it cannot be valid because we have not specified a schema against which to validate it, but it follows the basic rules of XML and is thus well-formed.