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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Rhetoric

This guide provides quick and easy access to library resources for Rhetoric assignments as well as guidance on getting research and writing help.

How to Find Editorials

An editorial is a written piece most often found in newspapers and magazines that typically addresses the opinion or viewpoint of senior editorial staff on a current or controversial issue.

Find Editorials: INFOGRAPHIC

Find Editorials (Accessible View)

Why use editorials?

Editorials can provide you with specific opinions or viewpoints on a given issue. As a rule, editorials focus on current, controversial topics.

Find editorials in databases:
  • Newspaper Databases often allow you to limit your results by "Editorials" as the document type.

  • Academic Search Ultimate allows you to limit results. In the left-hand side of the results list, select “Editorials” as the document type. To view individual editorials, click the HTML or PDF Full Text, or Discover links.

  • Nexis Uni offers a "News" section on the left-hand side of the page. 

  • Undergraduate Library has a great selection of general magazines where you can find editorials. Titles are shelved alphabetically in the periodicals section.

General Search Tips
  • Keep in mind the dates when your topic was of particular interest.

  • You are most likely to get the best results in your search for topics of national, rather than local or regional, interest.

  • Avoid using terms "pro" and "con" in your search, unless the issue frequently uses pro- or con- to identify supporters of the position (i.e. pro-life, pro-choice).

  • Read the abstracts of the editorials, when available, as these will provide you with a brief summary of the writer's viewpoint.

How to Find Pro/Con Arguments

Analyzing pro and con arguments forces readers to confront points of view. This enables readers to consider more facets of an issue and to develop a better understanding of the issue.

Pro/Con Arguments (VIDEO)

Pro/Con Arguments: INFOGRAPH

Pro / Con Arguments (Accessible View) 

Why use pro/con arguments?

  • Readers are forced to confront multiple points of view when analyzing pro and con arguments. This enables readers to consider more facets of an issue and to develop a better understanding of the topic. 

Where to find pro/con arguments:

Searching on your own

When to use pro/con arguments:

  • Pro/Con arguments often deal with current, controversial topics.

  • Keep in mind the dates when your topic was of particular interest.

  • You are most likely to get the best results in your search for topics of a national, rather than local or regional, interest.

  • Avoid using terms "pro" and "con" in your search. Instead, read the subject terms and abstracts of the articles that discuss your topic. You'll often see both sides of the argument presented in one article or in a group of articles.