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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Schools: Barriers to Change

Covers resources related to integrated pest management in K-12 schools.

Barriers to Change

Factors that may impede the implementation of Integrated Pest Management plans at schools may include a lack of:

  • Allocation of budgetary resources required for performing necessary repairs and conducting sanitation practices,
  • Time necessary to draft and adopt an IPM policy and designate an IPM coordinator,
  • Support at the decision-making (district or state) level for implementation of an IPM program,
  • Legislative requirements or compliance directives from the state or district,
  • Awareness of environmental risks and health hazards associated with traditional pest management,
  • Internal support and commitment for maintenance and monitoring

Readily available resources can help with overcoming the common barriers to successful implementation of IPM. Some examples include:

Barriers to Change Possible Position/Argument to Address the Barrier Resources
Budgetary limitations Investment costs will provide future financial savings Fears that IPM is more expensive than traditional pest control (See page 166)
Time necessary to draft and adopt an IPM policy and designate an IPM coordinator Pest management practices and policies can have an important impact on the quality of the school's environment. IPM in Schools - Model Pesticide Safety and IPM Guidance Policy for School Districts
Support at the decision-making (district or state) level for implementation of an IPM program U.S. EPA is encouraging school officials to adopt IPM practices and supporting this with guidelines for beginning the process. Managing Pests in Schools
Legislative requirements or compliance directives from the state or district School pesticide policies and programs are being adopted across the country and are continually improving. State and Local School Pesticide Policies
Awareness of environmental risks and health hazards associated with traditional pest management U.S. EPA uses the National Research Council's four-step process for human health risk assessment when evaluating health risks from pesticides. Assessing Human Health Risk from Pesticides
Internal support and commitment for maintenance and monitoring Examples of school IPM plans and forms, as well as what to look for, assist maintenance with monitoring. School IPM Directory and Integrated Pest Management Tools: Resources to Support IPM Implementation

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