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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

History 498H: Obscenity, Censorship, and the Regulation of Morals in the United States from 1873 to the Present

Course guide.

On this Page:

Find a partner. Together, exam each of these resources, and briefly answer the following questions:

  1. What is this resource?
  2. Could you use this as a secondary source?
  3. Could you use this as a primary source?

Primary or Secondary Source?

1.
Miller, Leslie J. "Uneasy Alliance: Women as Agents of Social Control." Canadian Journal of Sociology. 12.4 (Winter, 1987): 345-61.

2.
"Purity and Pornography: a Doctor's Reflections on Sex Obsession in Current Novels." Current Opinion. July-December, 1924: 49.

3.
Epstein, Aaron. "High Court Strikes Down a Porn Law." Philadelphia Inquirer. (Tuesday, February 25, 1986): A11.

4.
Alpert, Leo M. "Judicial Censorship of Obscene Literature." Harvard Law Review. 52.1 (November, 1938): 40-76.

5.
Sutherland, Halliday, M.D. "The Fallacies of Birth Control." The Forum.  77.6 (June, 1927): 841-48.

6.
Kipnis, Laura. Bound and Gagged: Pornography and the Politics of Fantasy in America. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1999.

7.
Bureau of Justice Statistics. "Attitudes Toward Laws Regulating The Distribution Of Pornography [By Sex, Race, Age, Educational Attainment, Occupation, Geographic Region, Religion, And Political Affiliation, Selected Years 1987-2002]." Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics, 2003.