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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

GeoLytics: Home

Learn how to navigate, analyze, and visualize U.S. Census data using GeoLytics web applications.

Welcome

This page will guide you through the ins and outs of using GeoLytics Planner's Package Plus to navigate, analyze and visualize U.S. Census data. If you are looking for other types of Census data, or if you need more information than is provided here, please check our LibGuide on Sources of Census Data or ask a librarian for assistance.

Note when using GeoLytics

• Census terms are not explicitly defined in Geolytics. See the Decennial Management Division Glossary for explanation of terms: http://www.census.gov/dmd/www/glossary.html

• Geographies change over time. The U.S. Census Bureau provides a listing of Reference Resources for Understanding Census Bureau Geography.

Share a resource!

Do you know of a useful online demographic data resource? Email the link to sc@library.illinois.edu​, and we'll add it to this guide.

What is GeoLytics?

GeoLytics configures U.S. Census data in a way that makes it relatively easy to extract and allows users to create custom generated tables, maps, and GIS layers of census variables. The University of Illinois Library offers access to their browser-based 2000 Planner's Package Plus, which includes the following data sets:​

  • 1990 Long Form in 2000 Boundaries: Based upon the long form (STF 3) questions answered by one in six households in the 1990 census, this allows users to access US Census data from 1990 and easily compare it with the 2000 Census data. It includes detailed demographic data about topics such as population, household structure, income, poverty, education level, employment, housing costs, immigration, and other variables.
  • 1980 Long and Short Forms in 2000 Boundaries: Allows users to access US Census data from 1980 and easily compare it with the 2000 Census data, using both the 1980 Long Form (STF-3) and Short Form (STF-1) datasets. It also includes detailed demographic data about topics such as population, household structure, income, poverty, education level, employment, housing costs, immigration, and other variables. Having the 1980 and 1990 data normalized to the 2000 boundaries simplifies time series analysis.
  • Neighborhood Change Database 1970-2010: Provides data from the 1970-2010 censuses at the census tract level. This dataset makes it easy to compare differences over time at the neighborhood, city, and state level. Demographic data includes information on population, education, poverty, race, income, employment, and other variables. This dataset allows users to compare any data from 1970-2010 in the 2010 census boundaries, making it one of the most effective for time series analysis.

 

Need help? Contact the Scholarly Commons with questions or to set up an appointment: sc@library.illinois.edu

 

Created by:

Karen Hogenboom's picture
Karen Hogenboom
Contact:
Scholarly Commons

306 Main Library

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