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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Cataloging Services: Dewey Decimal Classification

A guide on using DDC at Illinois.

S-Collection

The S-Collection (school collection), housed in the Social Science, Health, & Education Library (SSHEL) and the Center for Children's Books has a unique call number system. The interest level of this collection is for all ages of children from birth to young adulthood. The classification scheme varies according to type of book.

Assigning call numbers

S-Collection call numbers are based on hybrid DDC. Assign a cutter typically for the author if there is one (except in the case of biographies - see below). Check the OPAC and Voyager by author and cutter to determine whether a cutter has already been established, and whether it is unique. The same cutter must not be used for different authors. If a cutter has not been established, use the regular Cutter table in the OCLC Dewey Cutter program to create a new cutter. Check to make sure that the new cutter you have created is not already assigned to another author, perhaps in a different collection. Perform shelflisting to ensure that call numbers file in the correct order. Use two letters for a workmark (typically for the title, except in the case of biographies) and perform shelflisting so that titles by the same author file alphabetically.

Dewey Decimal Call numbers for Fiction

Books with the following DDC call numbers are classified as fiction:

  • 082 04             [E] ǂ2 23            (Fiction picture books for children)
  • 082 04             [Fic] ǂ2 23         (Fiction chapter books for children)
  • 082 04             813/.6 ǂ2 23       (Fiction books published in the U.S. since 2000)
  • 082 04             823/.92 ǂ2 23     (Fiction books published in the U.K. since 2000)

 

SE.

Book is predominantly pictures, with minimal text for young readers. Picture books usually (but not always) contain about 16 to 32 pages, are typically oversize, and with a few simple words or sentences. Picture books are read aloud to young children and may use words the child is unfamiliar with in order to build the child's language skills.

Classify as fiction (SE), unless the book is a special type of material such as a folk tale or fairy tale, counting book, alphabet book, biography or other non-fiction. See section on Special Types of Material below.

Picture books are typically cuttered by author. If a cutter has not been established, assign a new cutter using the regular Cutter table in the OCLC Dewey Cutter program. Make sure that the cutter you create is not already assigned to a different author. Perform shelflisting to ensure call numbers file in the correct order. Assign a workmark for the first two letters of the title (or first group of letters that produces a unique workmark) and shelflist so that titles by the same author file alphabetically.

Note:

LCSH for children's picture books (fiction) include the form subdivision ǂv Juvenile fiction, except for Stories in rhyme.

650 _0  ǂa Subject ǂv Juvenile fiction.

Example

Bib record:

MFHD:

Item record:

 

Stories in rhyme are picture books written in rhymed text (definition from LCGFT). Classify stories in rhyme as picture books (fiction SE)

Example

Bib record:

MFHD:

S. + cutter

Book is fiction (mostly text). Use for chapter books.

Assign a cutter (typically for the author). If a cutter is not established in Voyager, use the regular Cutter table in the OCLC Dewey Cutter program to assign a cutter. Make sure that the cutter you create is not already assigned to a different author. Perform shelflisting to ensure that call numbers file in the correct order. Use two letters for a workmark (typically for the title) and perform shelflisting so that works by the same author file alphabetically.

Note:

LCSH for children's fiction include the form subdivision ǂv Juvenile fiction.

650 _0  ǂa Subject ǂv Juvenile fiction.

Example:

Bib record:

MFHD:

Item record:

 

Novels in verse are novel-length fictional narratives expressed in poetry (definition from LCGFT). Classify contemporary young adult chapter books written in verse as fiction (S. + cutter), not as anthologies of poetry.

Example:

Bib record:

MFHD:

SB.

Book is an individual biography or autobiography. The target audience is children. (Memoirs and collective biographies are classed using S.+ DDC, see below for details)

A biography reflects the entire lifespan of the individual, beginning with birth, moving onto childhood etc. Check the summary note (520) and contents note (505) in the bibliographic record.

In the bibliographic record, the fixed field Biog is coded as: a (autobiography), b (individual biography), or c (collective biography)

Note:

LCSH for autobiographies, biographies, or collective biographies include the form subdivision ǂv Biography in the 650 field. This applies only to LCSH, not to children's subject headings.

600 10  ǂa Biographee name ǂv Juvenile literature.

650 _0  ǂa Subject (profession/identity) ǂz Country ǂv Biography ǂv Juvenile literature.

Prefer a subject (for the profession) that reflects ethnic minorities or women if applicable. For example, use Women astronauts rather than astronauts, or African American women authors rather than authors.

Autobiographies or biographies may be in the form of poems, in which case, use ǂv Juvenile poetry.

Examples:

Biography:

245 10  Marie Curie / ǂc Richard Tames.

600 10  Curie, Marie, ǂd 1867-1934 ǂv Juvenile literature.

650 _0  Chemists ǂz Poland ǂv Biography ǂv Juvenile literature.

655 _7  Biographies. ǂ2 lcgft

 

Biography:

245 10  Harriet Tubman : ǂb leading the way to freedom / ǂc Laurie Calkhoven.

600 10  Tubman, Harriet, ǂd 1822-1913 ǂv Juvenile literature.

650 _0  African American women ǂv Biography ǂv Juvenile literature.  

655 _7  Biographies. ǂ2 lcgft

 

Autobiography:

100 10  Woodson, Jacqueline, ǂe author.

245 10  Brown girl dreaming / ǂc Jacqueline Woodson.

520       Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. 

600 10  Woodson, Jacqueline ǂv Juvenile poetry.

650 _0  African American women authors ǂv Biography ǂv Juvenile poetry.

655  _7  Autobiographies. ǂ2 lcgft

655 _7   Autobiographical poetry. ǂ2 lcgft

 

Collective biography:

245 10   Almost astronauts : ǂb 13 women who dared to dream / ǂc Tanya Lee Stone.

610 20   Project Mercury (U.S.) ǂx History ǂv Juvenile literature.

650 _0   Women astronauts ǂz United States ǂv Biography ǂv Juvenile literature.

655 _7   Biographies. ǂ2 lcgft

 

Books that focus on a specific event, or contain selected anecdotes, or memoirs are not classified as pure biographies. Classify these as non-fiction (S.+ Dewey Decimal Classification call number). The fixed field Biog for such books is coded as d (contains biographical information). Use LCSH for autobiographies or biographies. 

For a biography, check the online catalog for other biographies about the individual to keep them together. Cutter for the biographee (using the regular Cutter table) with a workmark for the author. Perform shelflisting to ensure call numbers file in the correct order.

Example: Jack Nicholson, face to face by Robert Crane = SB. N52cr

Autobiographies are cuttered for the biographee (using the regular Cutter table) with a workmark (using 2 letters) for the author.

For multiple biographies and autobiographies, cutter for the biographee, then add a workmark with 2 letters for the biographer and a number starting with 2.

Collective biographies should be classified under S. + Dewey classification for the general subject matter, and cuttered by author with a workmark for the title.

Example: Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream by Tanya Lee Stone = S.629.450092 St724al
(629.450092 being the call number for astronauts)

 

Example (Biography)

Bib record:

MFHD:

Item record:

For autobiographies or biographies about authors, assign a Dewey Decimal call number representing the body of literature and year in which the author commenced publishing.

S. + Dewey classification

Book is non-fiction. This includes non-fictional anthologies that contain works by multiple authors (such as Best American Science Writing) and collective biographies (such as Almost Astronauts).

Use a Dewey classification specific for the subject.
Examples: 595.715 = behavior--insects, 595.7153 = predatory insects 

Assign a cutter (typically for the author). If a cutter is not established in Voyager, use the regular Cutter table in the OCLC Dewey Cutter program to assign a cutter. Make sure that the cutter you create is not already assigned to a different author. Perform shelflisting to ensure call numbers file in the correct order. Use two letters for a workmark (typically for the title) and perform shelflisting so that works by the same author file alphabetically.

Note:

LCSH for children's non-fiction include the form subdivision ǂv Juvenile literature.

650 _0  ǂa Subject ǂv Juvenile literature.

Example

Bib record:

MFHD:

Item record:

 

Special Types of Material

Translations

Translations are designated by a colon and language code following the classification number that indicates the language into which the book has been translated.

Designate a workmark representing the first two letters of the original title. (Use the title given in the 240 field in the bibliographic record. If there is no 240 field, the original title may be given in a 500 note). 

Use the language indicated in the 240 field subfield l for the language code. Alternatively, check the 041 field, subfield a, for the language of translation.

Example: a Spanish translation of The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss titled El Gato Ensombrerado = SE. G27ca:SP
Note that the letter preceding the colon is "ca" for "cat" and not  "ga" for "gato".

NOTE: If the work is translated into English, but no information is given as to the original title on the piece or in the OCLC record, then use cataloger's judgment (depending on whether the original title can be found easily). If it is difficult to find the original title, then create a local call number using the translated title and omit :E (for material translated into English) after the workmark.

Example: Unhappy moon by Saraswati Menon. Translated into English from Gujrati. (No information on the original title) = SE. M5278un

Folklore & fairy tales

Folklore and fairy tales that are true to the original should be classed in S.398.2 no matter the age level.

Folk tales, including folk tales from another culture, are compiled from the oral tradition. These include folk tales collected and compiled by the Brothers Grimm. Folk tales are classed as S.398.2

Exception: Novelized adaptations of well-known folk tales (including adaptations of folk tales compiled by the Brothers Grimm) or novelized adaptations of classical fairy tales should be classified as fiction and cuttered under the author’s name, not classified in S.398.2.

An example of this is A Curse Dark as Gold by Elizabeth C. Bunce, a YA novel that adapts and retells the story of Rumpelstiltskin (a folk tale compiled by the Brothers Grimm). This adaptation received the classification S. B881cu, not S.398.2 B881cu.

Exception: Fractured fairy tales. Fractured fairy tales have a twist or an ending that is different from the classical tale, and often take place in a modern setting. They are a retelling of the original tale by a different author and are classified as fiction (S. or SE.)

Example: In the versions of Little Red Riding Hood by Charles Perrault or the Brothers Grimm, the girl is eaten by the wolf. A fairy tale or well-known folk tale by a contemporary author (usually targeted for a younger audience) that remains true to the original plot is classified as S.398.2

On the other hand, Little Red, a picture book by Bethan Woollvin, is an updated tale in which the girl is not eaten by the wolf. This is a retelling of the original tale and is classified as fiction (SE for a fiction picture book).

Bib record

MFHD:

Classify mythological tales and legends under S.398.2 Classify serious works on religion and mythology under the appropriate DDC non-fiction call number.

If in doubt, refer fairy tales, folk tales, and adaptations to Alisha.

Poetry

Volumes of American poetry in English by one author should be classified under S.811 and cuttered by author.

Anthologies of poetry by multiple authors should be classified under S.808.81 and cuttered by title.

Do not classify the following as poetry: Stories in rhyme (see picture books classed under SE) or Novels in verse (see chapter books classed under S). Refer all other poetry to Alisha.

Collections of fictional short stories

Collections of fictional short stories from more than two literatures by the same author should be classified according to Dewey call number (based on (808.83) and cuttered by author.

Collections of fictional short stories from more than two literatures by multiple authors should be classified according to Dewey call number (based on (808.83) and cuttered by title.

Example 1:

For collections of fictional short stories based on cultures around the world by multiple authors, use S.808.83

(Source WebDewey)

Designate a cutter using the first word of the title (no workmark). Perform shelflisting to ensure that call numbers file in the correct order.

Example of Bib record:

Example of MFHD:

 

Example 2:

For collections of fictional American short stories by multiple authors, use S.813.0108 

(Source WebDewey)

Designate a cutter using the first word of the title (no workmark). Perform shelflisting to ensure that call numbers file in the correct order.

Graphic novels 

Non-fiction comic books

Biographical comic books

Graphic novels, non-fiction comic books, and biographical/autobiographical comic books should be classed in S.741.5 with a number representing the country of the creator appended to the base call number. Look up the number for the country in WebDewey.

Example: a graphic novel, or non-fiction comic book, or biographical comic book created by an author in Japan is classified as S.741.5952 + cutter.

741.5/952  Comic books--Japan

A graphic novel, or non-fiction comic book, or biographical comic book created by an author in the U.S. receives the call number S.741.5973 + cutter, etc.

741.5/973  Comic books--United States

Source: WebDewey

Use S.741.59 + country code for graphic novels or non-fiction comic books or biographical comic books (comic works published in relatively long segments in the form of short stories or novels) (Source: WebDewey).

Use S.741.569 + country code for works originally published as short comic strips (short horizontal segments of about 6 frames that typically appeared in daily newspapers, and are now compiled in a book). For example, Peanuts/Charlie Brown by Schulz.

Example

Bib record:

Note:

LCSH for graphic novels include the form subdivision ǂv Comic books, strips, etc.

650 _0  ǂa Subject ǂv Comic books, strips, etc.

Children's Subject Headings for graphic novels include the form subdivision ǂv Fiction

650 _1  ǂa Subject ǂv Fiction.

MFHD:

 

Non-Fiction Comic Books

LCSH for non-fiction comic books include the form subdivision ǂv Comic books, strips, etc.

650 _0  ǂa Subject ǂv Comic books, strips, etc.

Children's Subject Headings for non-fiction comic books include the form subdivision ǂv Cartoons and comics.

650 _1  ǂa Subject ǂv Cartoons and comics.

LCGFT (Library of Congress Genre/Form Terms) for non-fiction comic books may include:

655 _7  Nonfiction comics. ǂ2 lcgft

Example

Bib record:

 

Counting books

Counting books about counting up or down (1-2-3) should be classed in S.513.5

Counting books about basic math operations should be classed in S.513.21. Books that focus on specifically either addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division should be classed as below:

Source: WebDewey

Example

Bib record:

MFHD:

Alphabet books

Alphabet books (A-B-C) should be classed in S.421.1 

Example

Bib record:

MFHD:

Series

For fiction-based series designate a workmark using two letters to represent the series title.

Use the series title in the 800 subfield t or the 830 field in the bibliographic record. Note: indefinite and definite articles are omitted from the series title.

Append another workmark using two letters to represent the title proper (taken from the 245 field in the bibliographic record)

If the title proper also begins with the series title, or if the title proper begins with the same words for each book in the series, then derive a workmark (with two letters) using the next word as appropriate in the title proper in order to distinguish each individual book title in the series.

Example

Bib record:

MFHD:

 

Caldecott/Newberry Award Winners

For most award winners, two circulating copies go to the SSHEL S-Collection, then the third and fourth copies go to Rare Books.

The following instructions apply to the third and fouth copies for Rare Books:

In the holdings record for Rare Books, the location code in subfield b is: "rbx-nc".

In the item record for Rare Books, the perm. location code is: "Rare Bk [noncirc]. The item type is: "BOOK NOCIRC".

Award winners sent to Rare Books should be marked with "Attn: Tony Hynes" written on the streamer. Do not write in the book, do not attach a barcode, and do not affix a call number label to the book before sending.

Pop-Up books

All pop-up books (including books with flaps) go to Rare Books. Pop-up books are unmarked.

In the holdings record for Rare Books, the location code in subfield b is: "rbx-nc".

In the item record for Rare Books, the perm. location code is: "Rare Bk [noncirc]. The item type is: "BOOK NOCIRC".

Pop-up books sent to Rare Books should be marked with "Attn: Tony Hynes" written on the streamer. Do not write in the book, do not attach a barcode, and do not affix a call number label to the book before sending.

 

Entering call numbers in Voyager

When entering your call number into the Voyager cataloging client please follow these examples:

852 8_ ‡b shj ‡h SE. ‡i (cutter) ‡t 1

852 8_ ‡b shj ‡h S. ‡i (cutter) ‡t 1

852 8_ ‡b shj ‡h SB. ‡i (cutter) ‡t 1

852 8_ ‡b shj ‡h S. (Dewey) ‡i (cutter) ‡t 1

If you have an oversized book (taller than 29 cm OR wider than 26 cm for a book that is wider than it is tall) you will of course need to insert the prefix "Q." in ‡k:

852 8_ ‡b shj ‡k Q. ‡h SE. ‡i (cutter) ‡t 1

852 8_ ‡b shj ‡k Q. ‡h S. ‡i (cutter) ‡t 1

852 8_ ‡b shj ‡k Q. ‡h SB. ‡i (cutter) ‡t 1

852 8_ ‡b shj ‡k Q. ‡h S. (Dewey) ‡i (cutter) ‡t 1

Add a year to the end of a cutter if there are multiple editions of the item in Voyager. Add a work letter (from a-z) to the year to distinguish between multiple editions published in the same year. The first edition received does not receive a work letter. Add the work letter 'a' to another edition received within the same year of publication.

Save the updated holdings record to the database. Be sure to do a call number search in Voyager to check for duplicate call numbers after you’ve saved it by clicking the Search icon, selecting the radio button for Browse, choosing Call Number from the drop down menu.

S-Collection Reference Materials

In the holding record, the location for reference materials is shjr-nc.

In the item record, the Perm. Loc. is SSHEL SColl Ref [noncirc], and the Item Type is BOOK NOCIRC.

Labeling for S. Collection Books

See attached document below (S-Coll) for detailed instructions on creating call number labels and writing a call number in the book.

For books with jackets, use double barcodes when you add a new item record. You will also need to generate two classification labels for books with jackets.

To generate labels:

  1. From within the holdings record, click the 852 field.
  2. Press Control + F12 and the label macro will open.
  3. Make sure any applicable prefix (Q. for oversized books), S. Collection designation (S., SB. or SE.), Dewey number (for nonfiction), cutter, and copy number (for copies added when there is already a copy in Voyager) displays correctly.
  4. Click “Submit”
    • If a second label is needed, click “Submit and edit for another copy or vol.”

 

Retroactive reclassification

If there is a shelflisting conflict in author cutters for series due to misclassification, perform retroactive corrections for up to 3 existing works by the same author.