Skip to main content

University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

EALC 398 - Yellow Peril Redux: America’s Cultural Responses to the Economic Rise of Japan and China (1980s-2010s)

Description

 

This LibGuide provides an introduction to identifying primary and secondary sources to support EALC 398 -

Yellow Peril Redux:

America’s Cultural Responses to the Economic Rise of Japan and China (1980s-2010s)

Course Description

The spectacular and rapid expansion, and widespread perception of menace and domination, of the Japanese economy during the 1980s and then the Chinese economy during the first decades of the twenty-first century facilitated a broad cultural, economic, and political unease and fear in the United States. This unease and fear have played a fundamental role in American culture and discourse for several decades.

This undergraduate seminar titled “Yellow Peril Redux: America’s Cultural Responses to the Economic Rise of Japan and China” bridges the disciplinary gap between cultural and economic studies of U.S.-East Asian interactions. It aims to introduce to students an interdisciplinary explanation of the historical roots and cultural idioms beneath the contemporary economic and political debates concerning the U.S.-China “Trade War” and beneath the broader popular and political unease that deeply impacts people’s daily life and perceptions of U.S.-East Asian relations since the 1980s.

Students will be advised to study U.S. experience with East Asia cross the demarcation between humanities, economics, business and society, and between historical and empirical research. Students will examine primary sources from a variety of genres, including legal cases, political cartoons, news reports, films, and governmental documents from the late 19th century to the present. Our cross-disciplinary approach and transnational topics can help to translate academic research to classroom teaching and address real-life concerns faced by people from various walks of life in this era of community reconstruction via cross-border cultural and economic confrontation, controversies, communications and conversations.